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An associational study of Illinois sand prairie . local distribution,status within the association, and other features, for each species.?.Tore attention v/as given to the insects than to all the other groupsof anim.als; this is quite natural, however, as the insects are themost important and the m.ost conspicuous element in the animal life ofthe sand-prairie. Indeed, very fev/ faunal studies have treated bothvertebrate and invertebrate species, the taxonomio group being theusual unit; the study is not complete until all the animals are con-sidered. The criteria for determining v/hich species

An associational study of Illinois sand prairie . local distribution,status within the association, and other features, for each species.?.Tore attention v/as given to the insects than to all the other groupsof anim.als; this is quite natural, however, as the insects are themost important and the m.ost conspicuous element in the animal life ofthe sand-prairie. Indeed, very fev/ faunal studies have treated bothvertebrate and invertebrate species, the taxonomio group being theusual unit; the study is not complete until all the animals are con-sidered. The criteria for determining v/hich species Stock Photo
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Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AN2B47

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7.1 MB (118.3 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

1332 x 1875 px | 22.6 x 31.8 cm | 8.9 x 12.5 inches | 150dpi

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An associational study of Illinois sand prairie . local distribution,status within the association, and other features, for each species.?.Tore attention v/as given to the insects than to all the other groupsof anim.als; this is quite natural, however, as the insects are themost important and the m.ost conspicuous element in the animal life ofthe sand-prairie. Indeed, very fev/ faunal studies have treated bothvertebrate and invertebrate species, the taxonomio group being theusual unit; the study is not complete until all the animals are con-sidered. The criteria for determining v/hich species are dominantand v/hich secondary, are too complex and indefinite to be laid downon a hard and fast basis. As there is usually no great difficultyin recognizing the relation of the animal to the association, it hasbeen found expedient to delay the analysis and form-ulation of thesecriteria. Any species, plant or animal, may be considered dominantin the association, if its removal would seriously affect the natureor identity of that association.. Laboratory StudiesAt the beginning of the laboratory work, the method of study re-solved itself into three stages: 1. Determination of unidentified species. 2. The study of the individual ecology of each species, by reference to a broad field of zoological v/ritings. This includes a wide range of the ac-tivities and life needs of the animal, its assign-ment to the associations of which it is a part, anda statement of its ecological position in the asso-ciation . 3. The synthesis, from the complex mass of facts acquired in field and laboratory, of a unified account ofeach association as a whole, and of the relationsof each association to the environment and to thesurrounding associations. In the preparation of many faunal stud.ies, the second stage istreated incidentally or superficially. The information that can befound on habits, local distribution, food, interrelations, etc., inre^yrd to a particular species is scanty in the extreme; e

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