. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 246 THE AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL. April 16, but young bees kept dying until the fall honey-flow from the golden-rod and asters came, when there were no more dead bees. I am convinced it was the poison from the nightshade that killed the young bees. In this part of North Carolina there are so many other flowers blooming at the same time as the kalmia that the bees prefer, that they do not get much honey from the kalmia. For instance, the " redroot "—Ceanothus Americanus—when that is in bloom, the air around my apiary is filled at night with the o

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. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 246 THE AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL. April 16, but young bees kept dying until the fall honey-flow from the golden-rod and asters came, when there were no more dead bees. I am convinced it was the poison from the nightshade that killed the young bees. In this part of North Carolina there are so many other flowers blooming at the same time as the kalmia that the bees prefer, that they do not get much honey from the kalmia. For instance, the " redroot "—Ceanothus Americanus—when that is in bloom, the air around my apiary is filled at night with the o
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Image ID: RPDE9Y
. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 246 THE AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL. April 16, but young bees kept dying until the fall honey-flow from the golden-rod and asters came, when there were no more dead bees. I am convinced it was the poison from the nightshade that killed the young bees. In this part of North Carolina there are so many other flowers blooming at the same time as the kalmia that the bees prefer, that they do not get much honey from the kalmia. For instance, the " redroot "—Ceanothus Americanus—when that is in bloom, the air around my apiary is filled at night with the odor of the blossom. I do not believe that the bees will work on the poisonous plants like kalmia or nightshade unless they are forced to by there being nothing else. I think that "Novice " will find, if he observes his bees carefully, that they are getting the honey, while the kalmias are in bloom, from some other flower. He may find a few bees on the kalmia blossoms, but I do not think much of his honey comes from that flower. It is well under- stood among the mountains of Polk county, N. C, when there is a great deal of " ivy," that bitter honey is poisonous, and that it comes from the " ivy." W. A Thompson. Buena Vista, N. C. MOUNTAIN LAUREL HONEr, ETC. I have been interested in the communications with refer- ence to laurel honey. The experiences of those who have re- cently written in the American Bee Journal on that subject coincide with mine. It is now 27 years since I began keeping bees, and my bees have always had access to hundreds of acres of mountain laurel, and I have never heard or known of any one being sick from eating honey gathered therefrom. The truth is, I don't believe that bees ever gather poisonous honey from that source. Laurels are great bloomers, and in favorable seasons produce great quantities of nectar, and if it is poisonous, surely, in these long years, with my surround- ings, at least one case of poisoning from it