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. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 1917 AMERICAN BEr: JOURNAL 189 graft roses in his boyliood, lie bouglit a pocl<et dictionary and sub- scribed to the New York Tribu.. :. Having no other way of learning the news, he slowly and persistently translated the information of the weekly happenings with his diction- ary. Within a short time he was able to read from an American paper the current news so readily that he often read them to his wife in French as if the paper had been i)rinted in the French language. That quick grasp- ing of the language enabled him to write for the American Be

. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 1917 AMERICAN BEr: JOURNAL 189 graft roses in his boyliood, lie bouglit a pocl<et dictionary and sub- scribed to the New York Tribu.. :. Having no other way of learning the news, he slowly and persistently translated the information of the weekly happenings with his diction- ary. Within a short time he was able to read from an American paper the current news so readily that he often read them to his wife in French as if the paper had been i)rinted in the French language. That quick grasp- ing of the language enabled him to write for the American Be Stock Photo
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. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 1917 AMERICAN BEr: JOURNAL 189 graft roses in his boyliood, lie bouglit a pocl<et dictionary and sub- scribed to the New York Tribu.. :. Having no other way of learning the news, he slowly and persistently translated the information of the weekly happenings with his diction- ary. Within a short time he was able to read from an American paper the current news so readily that he often read them to his wife in French as if the paper had been i)rinted in the French language. That quick grasp- ing of the language enabled him to write for the American Bee Journal, as soon as he began receiving it. In 1867, his apiary increased rapidly, so rapidly that he found himself short of empty hives and needing more. Lumber was high and his purse was empty, so he tore up the floor of an attic which was made of wide boards of one-inch lumber, in the log house inhabited by the family, to procure lumber for hive making. The reward came the following year, 1868, when he harvested his first large crop. We have no data as to its quantity, but it amounted to several thousand pounds and honey sold at a high price then. In 1872 Charles Dadant made a trip to Italy to secure Italian bees. He had bought his first Italian queen in 1866, of an Ohio breeder, A. Gra}-. Then he tried importing, succeeding fairly well with Dr. Blumhoff, of Biasca, Italian Switzerland. But the death of this able breeder and repeated failure with other men, determined him to cross the ocean himself. He had been writing articles on American beekeep- ing which were appreciated and was made an honorary member of the Italian association. So he was al- ready well known, and this was sure to help his success. But nevertheless, the importations of that year were a dead failure. However, failure spells success for tlie indomitably persistent man. The faults had been discovered, the proper methods traced. In 1874, after careful instructions, followed with great exactness, Florini, o