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. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 1898. THE AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL. 105 are 200 subscribers, and it would require 1,000 to pay ex- penses out of pocket. But we needn't go to England for tiiat sort of honesty. It can be found In the columns of the Progressive Bee-Keeper, which has entered Its eighth year, and whose publisher says : "Friends, do you know the Progressive has never made a dol- ar for me yet? It is a fact. It has never paid more than expenses." And yet the Progressive is worth a dozen of those papers that flourlsht such long lists of subscribers, and then mysteriou

. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 1898. THE AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL. 105 are 200 subscribers, and it would require 1,000 to pay ex- penses out of pocket. But we needn't go to England for tiiat sort of honesty. It can be found In the columns of the Progressive Bee-Keeper, which has entered Its eighth year, and whose publisher says : "Friends, do you know the Progressive has never made a dol- ar for me yet? It is a fact. It has never paid more than expenses." And yet the Progressive is worth a dozen of those papers that flourlsht such long lists of subscribers, and then mysteriou Stock Photo
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. American bee journal. Bee culture; Bees. 1898. THE AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL. 105 are 200 subscribers, and it would require 1,000 to pay ex- penses out of pocket. But we needn't go to England for tiiat sort of honesty. It can be found In the columns of the Progressive Bee-Keeper, which has entered Its eighth year, and whose publisher says : "Friends, do you know the Progressive has never made a dol- ar for me yet? It is a fact. It has never paid more than expenses." And yet the Progressive is worth a dozen of those papers that flourlsht such long lists of subscribers, and then mysteriously faded out of existence. It has workt hard for success, but it seems clear that a bee-paper is not generally a Klondike. A Honey Syndicate is proposed in Belgium to meet the crisis that is upon them by which the price of ex- tracted honey has fallen till it will not bring in some cases more than 11 to 15 cents a pound. A. Gustin has formulated a constitution and by-laws for such an organization, which occupies nearly five pages of the Belgium bee-journal, Le Rucher Beige. According to the proposed plan each mem- ber agrees to deliver all his honey to the syndicate except enough for his own household, to furnish ouly pure honey, and not to get honey of a third party to furnish to the syndi- date. The matter is being warmly discust, pro and con, but all in the best spirit. *-•-•- Progress in Bee-Culture.—A. I. Root tells about it in New York Tribune. It makes one green with envy to hear him tell about getting 25 cents a pound for 6,000 pounds of extracted honey years ago. He also tells about a man he lately visited in Arizona who had about 300 colonies in one apiary, and averaged more than 200 pounds per colony ! But Mr. Root thinks bee-keeping is a most risky business. By a little carelessness or bad management a man can in a short time lose all. But he can pick up again with marvelous rapidity. A hundred colonies may be cut down to half a dozen In wintering; but if a m