. Amateur fruit growing. Fruit-culture. so THE APPLE. ing warm days in March, before the sap starts, as the removal of a large amount of foliage in June might give a serious check to the tree. Scions for grafting are generally cut in November, before severe weather. Very light pruning may be done safely at almost any time, except as noted above. If the work of pruning is pro- perly attended to there will be no need of heavy pruning, and gen- erally a little pinching or rubbing off of the growth in summer is sufficient. In a northern climate it is better not to prune at all than to prune too mu

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. Amateur fruit growing. Fruit-culture. so THE APPLE. ing warm days in March, before the sap starts, as the removal of a large amount of foliage in June might give a serious check to the tree. Scions for grafting are generally cut in November, before severe weather. Very light pruning may be done safely at almost any time, except as noted above. If the work of pruning is pro- perly attended to there will be no need of heavy pruning, and gen- erally a little pinching or rubbing off of the growth in summer is sufficient. In a northern climate it is better not to prune at all than to prune too mu Stock Photo
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. Amateur fruit growing. Fruit-culture. so THE APPLE. ing warm days in March, before the sap starts, as the removal of a large amount of foliage in June might give a serious check to the tree. Scions for grafting are generally cut in November, before severe weather. Very light pruning may be done safely at almost any time, except as noted above. If the work of pruning is pro- perly attended to there will be no need of heavy pruning, and gen- erally a little pinching or rubbing off of the growth in summer is sufficient. In a northern climate it is better not to prune at all than to prune too mu
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. Amateur fruit growing. Fruit-culture. so THE APPLE. ing warm days in March, before the sap starts, as the removal of a large amount of foliage in June might give a serious check to the tree. Scions for grafting are generally cut in November, before severe weather. Very light pruning may be done safely at almost any time, except as noted above. If the work of pruning is pro- perly attended to there will be no need of heavy pruning, and gen- erally a little pinching or rubbing off of the growth in summer is sufficient. In a northern climate it is better not to prune at all than to prune too much, and apple trees only need to have inter- locking and straggling branches removed or shortened. They need all their wood for the protection it affords. All wounds over one- half inch in diameter should be covered with grafting wax. When trees are received they should have all broken or bruised roots removed, and the ends of all roots cut off smooth. The top, too, should be cut back about one-half or more of its new growth to correspond to the loss of roots. Some varieties—the Wealthy, for instance—will sometimes kill back severely and then sprout from the roots. In such a case the sprouts should be encouraged to make a new tree, which they will do very quickly if given a little care, and then they are often more productive than ever. Injured. Trees.- One of the most common forms of injury to trees is girdling by mice or rabbits. If the girdling is not com- plete, even though only a small part of the inner bark extends across the wound, the best treatment is to bank up around it with earth, and this is good treatment for any wound. If injury of any kind is so far from the ground that banking up is impracticable, the wound should be covered with grafting wax and cloth, or with clay or cow manure, so as to exclude the air. When large wounds are left exposed they do not heal readily, and often the wood sea- sons through and permanent injury results. Covering the wounds with

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