. Acadian geology : the geological structure, organic remains, and mineral resources of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Geology -- New Brunswick; Geology -- Nova Scotia; Geology -- Prince Edward Island; Paleontology -- New Brunswick; Paleontology -- Nova Scotia; Paleontology -- Prince Edward Island. DISTRICT OF KICHMOND. 393 shaped holes named " plaster pits," sections of which arc exposed in the cliff; they penetrate both the anhydrite and common gypsum, though they are contracted where they pass through harder portions of the rock, and esitecially the veins of

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Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RR593W
. Acadian geology : the geological structure, organic remains, and mineral resources of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Geology -- New Brunswick; Geology -- Nova Scotia; Geology -- Prince Edward Island; Paleontology -- New Brunswick; Paleontology -- Nova Scotia; Paleontology -- Prince Edward Island. DISTRICT OF KICHMOND. 393 shaped holes named " plaster pits," sections of which arc exposed in the cliff; they penetrate both the anhydrite and common gypsum, though they are contracted where they pass through harder portions of the rock, and esitecially the veins of compact gypsum, some of which are only slightly inclined, and look at first sight like layers of deposition. The pits of which I saw sections have evidently resulted fronx the percolation of water through the more open parts of vertical joints, and they were cut off where they were intersected by another slightly inclined set of open fissures, which afforded a passage to the water. The accompanying sketch (Fig. 155) shows one of these pits and its relations to the joints and stratification of the gypsum. Fig. l55.—riasier Pits.. C C («) Gypsum vein. (h) Open joint. " (6.) Above the gypsum are a few layers of limestone, portions of which appear near the base of the cliff: one of them is studded with tarnished crystals of iron pyrites; another is a singular mixture of gray limestone and reddish granular gypsum. The portions of lime- stone contained in this rock do not appear to be fragments or pebbles, and they are penetrated by plates of selenitic gypsum. They may be parts of a bed of limestone broken up and mixed with gypsum when in a soft state, or the limestone and gypsum may have been deposited simultaneously and separated by molecular attraction. A rock of this kind is not rare as an accompaniment of gypsum, and it may be merely a result of the mixture of the soft surface of the gypsum with the mechanical detritus first deposited on it. " (7.) On the opposite

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