A view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the attic in the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over.  REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
RM2D1R8XKA view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the attic in the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
A view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over.  REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
RM2E7M6D2A view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
A view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the attic in the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over.  REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
RM2E6YM5JA view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the attic in the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
A view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the attic in the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over.  REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
RM2D2G50NA view of the 150 to 170-year-old chestnut tree from the attic in the house where Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam, November 16, 2007. Activists opposed to the felling of the chestnut tree Anne Frank could see as she hid from the Nazis on Thursday won the right to a court hearing that may save it from the chop. The tree, behind the Amsterdam warehouse annex where Anne Frank hid from the Nazis until 1944, is so diseased and damaged that there is a risk it could topple over. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)