A treatise on concrete, plain and reinforced : materials, construction, and design of concrete and reinforced concrete; 2nd ed. . oating of mortar. The latter planis amply sufl&cient for floors which are not subjected to excessive wear. 6i6 A TREATISE ON CONCRETE For a board floor, nailing strips are laid upon the concrete, or imbeddedin it at right angles to the supporting beams. With cinder concrete theplan is sometimes followed of nailing the floor boards directly into the con-crete. The objection to this is that the surface of the concrete must beleveled with great care, and it is difficul

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A treatise on concrete, plain and reinforced : materials, construction, and design of concrete and reinforced concrete; 2nd ed. . oating of mortar. The latter planis amply sufl&cient for floors which are not subjected to excessive wear. 6i6 A TREATISE ON CONCRETE For a board floor, nailing strips are laid upon the concrete, or imbeddedin it at right angles to the supporting beams. With cinder concrete theplan is sometimes followed of nailing the floor boards directly into the con-crete. The objection to this is that the surface of the concrete must beleveled with great care, and it is difficul
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Image ID: 2AJ506N
A treatise on concrete, plain and reinforced : materials, construction, and design of concrete and reinforced concrete; 2nd ed. . oating of mortar. The latter planis amply sufl&cient for floors which are not subjected to excessive wear. 6i6 A TREATISE ON CONCRETE For a board floor, nailing strips are laid upon the concrete, or imbeddedin it at right angles to the supporting beams. With cinder concrete theplan is sometimes followed of nailing the floor boards directly into the con-crete. The objection to this is that the surface of the concrete must beleveled with great care, and it is difficult to relay the boards if a new floor isrequired because the concrete becomes so hard with age. The cost of the labor of laying a concrete floor is dependent upon thecharacter of the building. In a case under the observation of the authorswhere the floors consisted of cinder concrete resting upon steel I-beams,a gang of nine laborers, with a foreman (in addition to the engineman, whoran the elevator,) mixed concrete in the basement to supply a gang ofeleven men, with foreman, who, on one of the upper floors, were placing. Fig. 193.— Form for Concrete Floor between Steel I-Beams. {See p. 016.) metal, wheeling concrete, leveling it, and cleaning forms. Six carpenters,with foremen, were employed building the forms, which were supportedfrom the girders, in advance of the concreters. This gang averaged 22 to25 batches (corresponding to 17 to 19 cu. yd.) of i : 2 : 5^ cinder concrete innine hours. Floor Forms. In a large building the floor panels should if possible beso designed that the same forms may be used more than once, althoughthey must not be removed until the concrete has attained sufficient strengthto sustain its own weight and any loading which will come upon it. If the floor slabs are supported by steel I-beams, the forms may beattached to the lower flanges, as shown in Fig. 193 a design of Mr. Wil-liam F. Keams. The steel, however, must be bent up further from thesuppor

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