. A tour round my garden . Natural history. 153 A TOXm ROUND MY GABDEN. â weapon, inflict upon your heart anew tte pangs of the adieux and the eternal separation. From that day, there is a portion of ourselves in the tomb; from that day, we only give ourselves up to the world and its distractions by escaping from ourselves, at the risk of being at every instant reseized, and brought back to the cemetery. In short, we have buried in their tomb all we once loved with them; flowers cultivated with them, airs sung together, griefs endured together, pleasures enjoyed together,âall things which reca

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. A tour round my garden . Natural history. 153 A TOXm ROUND MY GABDEN. â weapon, inflict upon your heart anew tte pangs of the adieux and the eternal separation. From that day, there is a portion of ourselves in the tomb; from that day, we only give ourselves up to the world and its distractions by escaping from ourselves, at the risk of being at every instant reseized, and brought back to the cemetery. In short, we have buried in their tomb all we once loved with them; flowers cultivated with them, airs sung together, griefs endured together, pleasures enjoyed together,âall things which recal the dead, and speak to you of them. I had in a solitary corner of my garden three hyacinths, which my father had planted, and which death did not allow him to see bloom. Every year, the period of their flowering was for me a solemnity, a funereal and religious festival; it was a melancholy remembrance, which revived and reblos- somed every year, and exhaled certain thoughts with its per- fume. The roots are dead now, and nothing lives of this dear association but in my own heart. But what a dear, yet sad, privilege man possesses above all created beings, in being thus able, by memory and thought, to follow those whom he has loved to the tomb, and there shut himself up living with the dead! What a melancholy privilege ! And yet where is there one among us who would lose it ? Who is he who would willingly forget all ?. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Karr, Alphonse, 1808-1890; Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889. London : F. Warne ; New York : Scribner, Welford and Armstrong

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