A mechanistic view of war and peace . k of fate, unless a new philosophybe introduced ; unless the web of life of the majorityof the inhabitants of the earth be so modified thatin the next generation peace patterns shall be in-creased and war patterns lessened. How may this be accomplished ? An analysis ofmans adaptive response to the web of life may showthe way, since conduct is the result of both phylogeny(species experience) and ontogeny (individual expe-rience). The offspring of animals at the time of birth areslightly if at all equipped to adapt themselves toenvironment; the simpler the r

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A mechanistic view of war and peace . k of fate, unless a new philosophybe introduced ; unless the web of life of the majorityof the inhabitants of the earth be so modified thatin the next generation peace patterns shall be in-creased and war patterns lessened. How may this be accomplished ? An analysis ofmans adaptive response to the web of life may showthe way, since conduct is the result of both phylogeny(species experience) and ontogeny (individual expe-rience). The offspring of animals at the time of birth areslightly if at all equipped to adapt themselves toenvironment; the simpler the r
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Image ID: 2AJ8TBE
A mechanistic view of war and peace . k of fate, unless a new philosophybe introduced ; unless the web of life of the majorityof the inhabitants of the earth be so modified thatin the next generation peace patterns shall be in-creased and war patterns lessened. How may this be accomplished ? An analysis ofmans adaptive response to the web of life may showthe way, since conduct is the result of both phylogeny(species experience) and ontogeny (individual expe-rience). The offspring of animals at the time of birth areslightly if at all equipped to adapt themselves toenvironment; the simpler the reaction of a species,the earlier is its mechanism for adaptation completed.Hence we find for the young of each species differentmethods and different periods of time for completingtheir adaptation for adult life, varying from thesimple adaptation of the fish, that never even knowsits parents, to the increasingly complex adaptationsof the birds, whose parents protect, feed, and givethem their simple training; of the beaver, whose off-. The Charge EVOLUTION TOWARD PEACE 99 spring are taught even to play at making dams ; andfinally of the gregarious animals whose young remainwith the flock or herd and are taught by example.The carnivora train their young to kill, and the youngof monkeys, whose survival depends upon an adapta-tion to continual alertness, receive from their parentsa careful training in strategy. To accomplish thislonger tutelage required by the anthropoids, theparents keep their offspring with them during a longerperiod of time, and thus is formed the family — thedawn of human society. From the periods oftraining and education received by the young ofanthropoids we pass to the progressively longerperiods required for the training of the Bushman,the cave man, the semi-civilized, and finally thecivilized man. The brain of man may be likened to a moving-picture film running from birth to death. Amongthe numberless pictures some obtain possession ofthe final common pa