. A manual of weeds : with descriptions of all the most pernicious and troublesome plants in the United States and Canada, their habits of growth and distribution, with methods of control . Weeds. COMPOSITAE (COMPOSITE FAMILY) 463 A plant once known only on western prairies, but now common in eastern fields, the wide and rapid distribution having been accom- plished by impure commercial seeds and baled hay, of which the refuse is spread on the fields. Stems one to three feet tall, simple or branching near the base, rather stout, bristly hairy. Leaves alternate, oblong, two to six inches in len

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. A manual of weeds : with descriptions of all the most pernicious and troublesome plants in the United States and Canada, their habits of growth and distribution, with methods of control . Weeds. COMPOSITAE (COMPOSITE FAMILY) 463 A plant once known only on western prairies, but now common in eastern fields, the wide and rapid distribution having been accom- plished by impure commercial seeds and baled hay, of which the refuse is spread on the fields. Stems one to three feet tall, simple or branching near the base, rather stout, bristly hairy. Leaves alternate, oblong, two to six inches in len
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Image ID: PG22X2
. A manual of weeds : with descriptions of all the most pernicious and troublesome plants in the United States and Canada, their habits of growth and distribution, with methods of control . Weeds. COMPOSITAE (COMPOSITE FAMILY) 463 A plant once known only on western prairies, but now common in eastern fields, the wide and rapid distribution having been accom- plished by impure commercial seeds and baled hay, of which the refuse is spread on the fields. Stems one to three feet tall, simple or branching near the base, rather stout, bristly hairy. Leaves alternate, oblong, two to six inches in length, thick, hairy, pointed at both ends, entire, or slightly wavy-toothed, the lower ones spatulate, three-nerved and with grooved petioles, those on the stalks sessile and clasping. Heads two to four inches broad, solitary on long hairy peduncles, the rounded disk brownish purple, its florets perfect and fertile, the long sterile rays brilliant orange. Bracts of the involucre in two or three rows, spreading, rough and hairy. Achenes black or very dark brown, about an eighth of an inch long, narrow, four-angled and without a pap- pus. (Fig. 323.). Fig. 323. — Black- eyed Susan (fiudf beckia hirta). X i. Means of control Being biennial, this weed is readily sup pressed by pulling or close cutting before its seeds develop. But care must be taken that it is not continually reintroduced in poorly cleaned seed. PURPLE CONE-FLOWER Braunhria purpurea, Britton Other English names: Red Sunflower, Black Sampson. Native. Perennial. Propagates by seeds. Time of bloom: July to October. Seed-time: August to November. Range: Virginia to Missouri, southward to the Carolinas, Alabama, and Louisiana. Locally in the Northern States from New York to Michigan. Habitat: Meadows, fence rows, and waste places.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly