. A manual for the study of insects. Insects. H YMEN OP TERA. 66s distinctly from the wasps and the digger-wasps, which pro- vision their nests with other insects or with spiders. The superfamily Apina includes two famiHes: the An- drenidae or short-tongued bees, and the Apidae or long- tongued bees. These can be separated as follows:— A. Bees with the terminal portion of the lower Hp, the glossa, flat- tened and shorter than the mentum; and with the basal segments of the labial palpi not unlike the following segments, p. 665. ANDRENIDiE. AA. Bees with the glossa slender, not flattened, and lo

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. A manual for the study of insects. Insects. H YMEN OP TERA. 66s distinctly from the wasps and the digger-wasps, which pro- vision their nests with other insects or with spiders. The superfamily Apina includes two famiHes: the An- drenidae or short-tongued bees, and the Apidae or long- tongued bees. These can be separated as follows:— A. Bees with the terminal portion of the lower Hp, the glossa, flat- tened and shorter than the mentum; and with the basal segments of the labial palpi not unlike the following segments, p. 665. ANDRENIDiE. AA. Bees with the glossa slender, not flattened, and longer than the meiitum; and with the basal segments of the labial palpi elongate, p. 666 ApiDiE. Family Andrenid^ (An-dren'i-dae). The Short-tongued Bees, The family Andrenidse includes several genera of bees which agree in having the glossa shorter than the mentum. and flattened (Fig. 794). In some genera the glossa is spear-shaped, in others it is heart-shaped. The different genera of this family vary greatly in habits, but none of the species are social. Among the more common short- tongued bees are some that make their nests in the ground, and on this account are termed mining-bees. It should be remembered, how- ever, that some of the Apidae are also mining- bees, and that not all of the Andrenidse are Fig. 794.--Labium of Sphecodes, /«, miners. mentum; ^i pal- pus J g^ g"lassa The nest .0^ a mining-bee usually consists of a tunnel, more or less branched, each branch leading to a single cell. The walls of these cells are glazed, appearing like the surface of earthenware. In each cell there is stored a quantity of pollen and nectar-paste, an ^%% is laid with this food, and the cell is then closed up. Among the larger of our common mining-bees are those. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work

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