. A manual for the study of insects. Insects. 62 THE STUDY OF INSECTS. appendages are termed the maxillary palpi. In the maxiUse of certain biting insects, as the grasshoppers and the ground beetles, there is an appendage usually consisting of two segments : this is the galea (ga'le-a) or outer lobe. In some of these insects, as the ground-beetles and the tiger- beetles, the galea is shaped like a palpus, and thus there appears to be two pairs of maxillary palpi (Fig. 'jS), The labium is furnished with a pair of jointed appendages ; these are the labial palpi {¥\g. 75, 11, d). The Thorax and i

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. A manual for the study of insects. Insects. 62 THE STUDY OF INSECTS. appendages are termed the maxillary palpi. In the maxiUse of certain biting insects, as the grasshoppers and the ground beetles, there is an appendage usually consisting of two segments : this is the galea (ga'le-a) or outer lobe. In some of these insects, as the ground-beetles and the tiger- beetles, the galea is shaped like a palpus, and thus there appears to be two pairs of maxillary palpi (Fig. 'jS), The labium is furnished with a pair of jointed appendages ; these are the labial palpi {¥\g. 75, 11, d). The Thorax and its Appendages. The thorax is the second or intermediate region of the body ; it is the region that bears, in the adult insect, the organs of locomotion, the legs, and the wings when they are present. This region is composed of three of the body- segments more or less firmly joined together ; the segments are most readily distinguished by the fact that each bears a pair of legs. In winged insects, the wings are borne by the second and third segments. The first segment of the thorax, the one next to the head, is named the prothorax; the second thoracic segment is the mesothorax; and the third, the nietathorax. The Legs.—Each leg consists of the following parts, beginning with the one next to the body (see Fig. ']j): coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia, and tarsus. Each of these parts consists of a single seg- ment except that in certain Hymenoptera the trochanter consists of two segments (Fig. TJ, t), and in most insects the tarsus consists of several seg- ments. The number of seg- ments of the tarsus varies from one to six ; the most common number is five. Frequently the first segment of the tarsus is much longer than either of. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Comstock, John Henry, 1849-1931; Co