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. A life of Napoleon Boneparte:. h living in the richest ofcountries, the rapacity and dishonesty of the army con-tractors were such that food reached the men half spoiledand in insufficient quantities, while the clothing supplied waspure shoddy. Many officers were laid up by wounds orfatigue; those who remained at their posts were discouraged,and threatening to resign. The Directory had tamperedwith Bonapartes armistices and treaties until Naples andRome were ready to spring upon the French; and Venice,if not openly hostile, was irritating the army in many ways.Bonaparte, in face of these dif

. A life of Napoleon Boneparte:. h living in the richest ofcountries, the rapacity and dishonesty of the army con-tractors were such that food reached the men half spoiledand in insufficient quantities, while the clothing supplied waspure shoddy. Many officers were laid up by wounds orfatigue; those who remained at their posts were discouraged,and threatening to resign. The Directory had tamperedwith Bonapartes armistices and treaties until Naples andRome were ready to spring upon the French; and Venice,if not openly hostile, was irritating the army in many ways.Bonaparte, in face of these dif Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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. A life of Napoleon Boneparte:. h living in the richest ofcountries, the rapacity and dishonesty of the army con-tractors were such that food reached the men half spoiledand in insufficient quantities, while the clothing supplied waspure shoddy. Many officers were laid up by wounds orfatigue; those who remained at their posts were discouraged,and threatening to resign. The Directory had tamperedwith Bonapartes armistices and treaties until Naples andRome were ready to spring upon the French; and Venice,if not openly hostile, was irritating the army in many ways.Bonaparte, in face of these difficulties, was in genuinedespair: Everything is being spoiled in Italy, he wrote the Directory. The prestige of our forces is being lost. A policy which will give youfriends among the princes as well as among the people, is necessary.Diminish your enemies. The influence of Rome is beyond calculation.It was a great mistake to quarrel with that power. Had I been con-sulted I should have delayed negotiations as I did with Genoa and. BONAPARTE A LA BATAILLE darcOLE, LE ZJ BRUMAIRE, AN V. THE FIRST ITALIAN CAMPAIGN 71 Venice. Whenever your general in Italy is not the centre of everything,you will run great risks. This language is not that of ambition; Ihave only too many honors, and my health is so impaired that I thinkI shall be forced to demand a successor. I can no longer get on horse-back. My courage alone remains, and that is not sufficient in a positionlike this. It was in such a situation that Bonaparte saw the Aus-trian force outside of Mantua, increased to fifty thousandmen, and a new commander-in-chief, Alvinzi, put at its head.The Austrians advanced in two divisions, one down theAdige, the other by the Brenta. The French division whichmet the enemy at Trent and Bassano were driven back. Inspite of his best efforts, Bonaparte was obhged to retire withhis main army to Verona. Things looked serious. Alvinziwas pressing close to Verona, and the army on the Adigewas slowly dri