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A history of the British sessile-eyed Crustacea . alani. Balanus balanoides, male. 268 BOPYKID^. by Mr. Henry Goodsir in the Edinburgh New Philoso-phical Journal for 1843, where he erroneously describedthe female, or the animal represented in our right-handfigure, as the male of the cirriped {Balanus balanoides),and the animal, copied in our left-hand figure, as beingparasitic upon that supposed male. About the time of the publication of a memoir in theAnnals of Natural History, On the Development ofthe Cirripeds, in 1851, our attention was drawn to a fleshymass of material that we found attac

A history of the British sessile-eyed Crustacea . alani. Balanus balanoides, male. 268 BOPYKID^. by Mr. Henry Goodsir in the Edinburgh New Philoso-phical Journal for 1843, where he erroneously describedthe female, or the animal represented in our right-handfigure, as the male of the cirriped {Balanus balanoides),and the animal, copied in our left-hand figure, as beingparasitic upon that supposed male. About the time of the publication of a memoir in theAnnals of Natural History, On the Development ofthe Cirripeds, in 1851, our attention was drawn to a fleshymass of material that we found attac Stock Photo
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1846 x 1353 px | 31.3 x 22.9 cm | 12.3 x 9 inches | 150dpi

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A history of the British sessile-eyed Crustacea . alani. Balanus balanoides, male. 268 BOPYKID^. by Mr. Henry Goodsir in the Edinburgh New Philoso-phical Journal for 1843, where he erroneously describedthe female, or the animal represented in our right-handfigure, as the male of the cirriped {Balanus balanoides),and the animal, copied in our left-hand figure, as beingparasitic upon that supposed male. About the time of the publication of a memoir in theAnnals of Natural History, On the Development ofthe Cirripeds, in 1851, our attention was drawn to a fleshymass of material that we found attached to the base ofthe animal of the Balanus balanoides, lying within theshell. This we first took to be the ovisac of the Balanus,because we found it always full of ova, which we thenthought were the ova of the Balanus in one particularstage. In this we thought we were confirmed by thefact that we never found the ova of Balanus in the condi-tion most familiar to us in any of those specimens wherethese ova were found. A drawing of the mass, which. DKVELOPMENT OF LARVA OF CRYPTOTHIRIA BALANI. we submitted, to Mr. Darwin, induced him to suggest itas being the parasite that Mr. Goodsir described as themale of the cirriped; and an examination of the article On the Sexes of the Cirripeds, clearly showed us that CRYPTOTHIKIA BALANT. 269 Mr. Goodsirs figures were more or less perfect repre-sentations of the mass that we had observed. The young, which we have frequently taken in anincomplete stage, are developed as in true Isopoda; andthe earliest larval condition, as figured by Goodsir andRathke, shows that the animal is, both in its develop-ment and parasitic habit, closely allied to the BopyroidCrustacea. The animal represented in the middle of our wood-cut, which we consider to be the male, corresponds, sofar as the liead and anterior segments of the body areconcerned, with that which Mr. Goodsir has figured asbeing the anterior segments of his supposed male, and,if Mr. Goodsirs dis

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