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. A history of British birds . 680 GA y/J5. LARID^. LARID^.. Stercokarius parasiticus (Linuieus*). THE LONG-TAILED OR BUFFONS SKUA. Lestris Buffonii. This smallest species of the genus Stercorarius, althoughmuch more rare than the Arctic Skua, has occasionally beentaken in this country, generally in autumn. It is distinctlycircumpolar in its breeding-range, and although it has beensaid to nest sporadically in Caithness and the Orkneys,the evidence can hardly be considered conclusive. Mr. R.Gray states that in the summer of 1863 he examined a pairshot on the island of Wiay in the Hebrides, as t

. A history of British birds . 680 GA y/J5. LARID^. LARID^.. Stercokarius parasiticus (Linuieus*). THE LONG-TAILED OR BUFFONS SKUA. Lestris Buffonii. This smallest species of the genus Stercorarius, althoughmuch more rare than the Arctic Skua, has occasionally beentaken in this country, generally in autumn. It is distinctlycircumpolar in its breeding-range, and although it has beensaid to nest sporadically in Caithness and the Orkneys,the evidence can hardly be considered conclusive. Mr. R.Gray states that in the summer of 1863 he examined a pairshot on the island of Wiay in the Hebrides, as t Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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2CP5WW6

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1815 x 1376 px | 30.7 x 23.3 cm | 12.1 x 9.2 inches | 150dpi

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. A history of British birds . 680 GA y/J5. LARID^. LARID^.. Stercokarius parasiticus (Linuieus*). THE LONG-TAILED OR BUFFONS SKUA. Lestris Buffonii. This smallest species of the genus Stercorarius, althoughmuch more rare than the Arctic Skua, has occasionally beentaken in this country, generally in autumn. It is distinctlycircumpolar in its breeding-range, and although it has beensaid to nest sporadically in Caithness and the Orkneys,the evidence can hardly be considered conclusive. Mr. R.Gray states that in the summer of 1863 he examined a pairshot on the island of Wiay in the Hebrides, as they hoveredover a marsh where there were nests of the Arctic Skua, * Larus parasiticus, Linnteus, Syst. Nat. Ed. 12, i. p. 226 (1706). TheEditor believes that he has shown (P. Z. S. 1876, p. 327) that the descriptiongiven by Linnajus can only apply to this species, although the name was subse-quently transferred, most unfortunately and improperly, to the Arctic Skua. LONG-TAILED SKUA. 681 and he considers it probable that they were breeding there.In the au