. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. SHEET NO. I. SHEET NO. 2. REDUCED FIGURES OF SSEW DESIGNS FOR FRET OR SCROLL SAWYERS. SIZE OF SHEETS 28 BY 22 INCHES. {For description see preceding page,). Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Phin, John, 1830-1913. [from old catalog]. New York, The Industrial publication company
RMPFAX44. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. SHEET NO. I. SHEET NO. 2. REDUCED FIGURES OF SSEW DESIGNS FOR FRET OR SCROLL SAWYERS. SIZE OF SHEETS 28 BY 22 INCHES. {For description see preceding page,). Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Phin, John, 1830-1913. [from old catalog]. New York, The Industrial publication company
. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PKACTICAL APICULTUEE. 27. A more appropriate name for these would be metal arms. Metal arms Lave been constructed in various ways—of wire and of sheet tin. The usual way is to make them of tin, and they are so formed that they may be folded round the corner of the frame so as to hold firmly and present two thin edges by which they rest upon the bearers or rabbets. The advantage of metal corners is that the bees cannot fasten the frames to the rabbets with propolis. The frames are therefore easily set free for ex- amination and do not require to be
RMPFAX5H. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PKACTICAL APICULTUEE. 27. A more appropriate name for these would be metal arms. Metal arms Lave been constructed in various ways—of wire and of sheet tin. The usual way is to make them of tin, and they are so formed that they may be folded round the corner of the frame so as to hold firmly and present two thin edges by which they rest upon the bearers or rabbets. The advantage of metal corners is that the bees cannot fasten the frames to the rabbets with propolis. The frames are therefore easily set free for ex- amination and do not require to be
. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PKACTICAL APICULTUEE. 27. A more appropriate name for these would be metal arms. Metal arms Lave been constructed in various ways—of wire and of sheet tin. The usual way is to make them of tin, and they are so formed that they may be folded round the corner of the frame so as to hold firmly and present two thin edges by which they rest upon the bearers or rabbets. The advantage of metal corners is that the bees cannot fasten the frames to the rabbets with propolis. The frames are therefore easily set free for ex- amination and do not require to be
RMRCT4N2. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PKACTICAL APICULTUEE. 27. A more appropriate name for these would be metal arms. Metal arms Lave been constructed in various ways—of wire and of sheet tin. The usual way is to make them of tin, and they are so formed that they may be folded round the corner of the frame so as to hold firmly and present two thin edges by which they rest upon the bearers or rabbets. The advantage of metal corners is that the bees cannot fasten the frames to the rabbets with propolis. The frames are therefore easily set free for ex- amination and do not require to be
. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PRACTICAL APICULTURE. 23 ating itself, and for this the queen and workers are all that is required. "We sometimes speak of a queenless colony, and the expression is not incorrect, but it is equivalent to saying that the colony is not full or perfect. The distinction between a colony and a swarm is simply this: A swarm is a new colony just separated from the parent stock. See Swarm. Colt.—A. name sometimes given to the second after-swarm. The" third is called a fitly. See Filly. Comb.—A number of cells built together so as to form a sheet.
RMPFAX5N. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PRACTICAL APICULTURE. 23 ating itself, and for this the queen and workers are all that is required. "We sometimes speak of a queenless colony, and the expression is not incorrect, but it is equivalent to saying that the colony is not full or perfect. The distinction between a colony and a swarm is simply this: A swarm is a new colony just separated from the parent stock. See Swarm. Colt.—A. name sometimes given to the second after-swarm. The" third is called a fitly. See Filly. Comb.—A number of cells built together so as to form a sheet.
. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PRACTICAL APICULTURE. 23 ating itself, and for this the queen and workers are all that is required. "We sometimes speak of a queenless colony, and the expression is not incorrect, but it is equivalent to saying that the colony is not full or perfect. The distinction between a colony and a swarm is simply this: A swarm is a new colony just separated from the parent stock. See Swarm. Colt.—A. name sometimes given to the second after-swarm. The" third is called a fitly. See Filly. Comb.—A number of cells built together so as to form a sheet.
RMRCT4NA. A dictionary of practical apiculture. Bees. PRACTICAL APICULTURE. 23 ating itself, and for this the queen and workers are all that is required. "We sometimes speak of a queenless colony, and the expression is not incorrect, but it is equivalent to saying that the colony is not full or perfect. The distinction between a colony and a swarm is simply this: A swarm is a new colony just separated from the parent stock. See Swarm. Colt.—A. name sometimes given to the second after-swarm. The" third is called a fitly. See Filly. Comb.—A number of cells built together so as to form a sheet.