. 10 cm (from Goode 1884) Common Name: black drum Scientific Name: Pogonias cromis Other Common Names: sea drum, gray drum, oyster cracker, drum fish, striped drum, puppy drum, butterfly drum (Sutter et al. 1986); grand tambour (French), tambor,corvinon negro (Spanish) (Fischer 1978, NOAA 1985). Classification (Robins et al. 1991) Phylum: Chordata Class: Osteichthyes Order: Perciformes Family: Sciaenidae Value Commercial: Black drum are commercially harvested primarily in inshore state territorial waters, using a wide variety of gear and vessels between states and regions (NOAA 1985, Sutter et

- Image ID: MCKT3B
The Bookworm Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: MCKT3B
. 10 cm (from Goode 1884) Common Name: black drum Scientific Name: Pogonias cromis Other Common Names: sea drum, gray drum, oyster cracker, drum fish, striped drum, puppy drum, butterfly drum (Sutter et al. 1986); grand tambour (French), tambor,corvinon negro (Spanish) (Fischer 1978, NOAA 1985). Classification (Robins et al. 1991) Phylum: Chordata Class: Osteichthyes Order: Perciformes Family: Sciaenidae Value Commercial: Black drum are commercially harvested primarily in inshore state territorial waters, using a wide variety of gear and vessels between states and regions (NOAA 1985, Sutter et al. 1986, Geaghan and Garson 1993, Leardetal. 1993). Fishing effort occurs through- out the year, but is especially high during the spring and summer. Gear used includes trammel nets, gill nets, purse seines, haul seines, trot lines, hand lines, and trawls (trawled fish are usually bycatch). The majority of commercial catch in the U.S. occurs in the Gulf of Mexico. In estuarine waters, most of the fish caught are relatively young (4 yrs.) are harvested mainly in nearshore waters of the Gulf. Landings in the states along the Gulf from 1950 to 1976 comprised 84% of the total harvest in the U.S., with Texas providing as much as 71 % of this total (Silverman 1979, Leard et al. 1993). Black drum in the Gulf were relatively underutilized prior to the late 1970's because their flesh was considered to be poor quality, particu- larly in the largerfish (bull drum). In addition, a marine cestode (the pleurocercoid stage), commonly called the "spaghetti worm" infects the flesh in larger fish making it less marketable, although it poses no human health threat (Simmons and Breuer 1962). Smallerfish (0.5-1.5 kg) called "butterfly drum" were therefore considered to be more valuable in the fishery. It sold mostly as fresh product in local fish markets (Fischer 1978). The increased market for large red drum for the Cajun dish "blackened redfish" in the late 1970's

Similar stock images